Tag Archives: dysfunctional families

What Develops After the Camera Clicks

pinterest-craft-fails-21-1So I stole today’s blog post idea from Pastor Steven Furtick, just sayin’ that up front in case any of you are fans of his pod cast or watch him online. Yes, he uses the wrong Bible…you probably won’t like his music and you may find a dozen other things you consider faults. Before you judge, check the mirror. This sermon was just so spot on I felt the need to do the Jesus Chick version. It was like he took a page out of my life and scribbled it on his sermon notes. Seriously.

Almost every time (if not every time) I speak, someone says to me, “I love how you’re so very real.” The reality of that statement for me is, they’re saying, “I love how you let us see how very messed up you are.” And that’s the truth. I’ve never professed to be a model of how you should live your life, I’m more the “what not to do” version. I realized this again when I spoke at the Ladies Retreat at Five Forks Community Church and they had decorated their platform with the goal of showing a messed up, packrat home. My first thought was, wow, I’ll be right at home here. My home will never be on the better homes and gardens cover, unless it’s as a cleaning project. I run from daylight to dark (literally). So for someone to judge my housekeeping, they have to take over some of my responsibilities. But they’ll have to fight me for them, because I’d rather serve the Lord than clean house. Yes, I’m using that as an excuse to be messy, I’m sure God will line me out about it when I get to Heaven.

Steven Furtick’s sermon title was “The Problem with Pinterest.” His problem was that when the projects on Pinterest (a social media sight) were tried by the average mortal soul they never quite turned out like they had anticipated. More often than not they were epic failures that cost you money, left you discouraged and feeling inadequate and in constant comparison of the “perfect people” whose children are well behaved, their homes are immaculate and they look like they just stepped off the cover of Vogue. Personally, I prefer another sight Steven Furtick tuned me into which is www.pinterestfail.com, ‘where good intentions come to die.’ How precious is that! Now that’s a website I can identify with. It’s filled with pictures of Pinterest projects gone wrong. You can literally burn up hours laughing at what would been your picture had you actually tried the project.

Ironically enough times haven’t changed since the days of Moses.

In  Corinthians 3:13 Apostle Paul says:

And not as Moses, which put a veil over his face, that the children of Israel could not stedfastly look to the end of that which is abolished:

It’s often thought that Moses put the veil over his face because it was too bright to look upon, but more than likely the veil was there to keep them from seeing that the glory was fading away, and thereby they’d become discouraged because the old covenant wasn’t a permanent fix. (Exodus 34:29-35). And such is life…

We are continually looking upon Pinterest posts, Facebook profiles, Twitterpics and Instagrams and believing that that perfect image is everlasting. It lasted for the split second the picture was taken. And then more than likely the child threw a tantrum, the happy couple got in a huge fight because someone was unappreciated or spent too much money and that perfect family went back to being perfectly dysfunctional. The picture perfect home may very well have a huge crack in the foundation of life and although it looks beautiful, the reality is very ugly.

But nobody posts that. Well some do, but I’m quick to hide them, who wants to see it! Well some do… those who are every bit as miserable but love looking and judging someone else’s misery.

Praise God for the New Covenant! Even though the perfect children fade into tantrum throwing, backing talking, door slamming teens, the picturesque home has Oreo’s ground into the carpet and dog hair on the couch, and the happy couple isn’t always so happy when the door closes behind the company that showed up unannounced, we still have a perfect plan.

It’s the one that we’re not in control of.

It’s the one that covered by the unconditional forgiveness and grace of our Savior, who loves us in our messes and in our brokenness.

For marketing my blog and speaking, I call myself “The Jesus Chick.” That doesn’t mean I’m so spiritual I have all of life figured out. It just means I’m pretty tight with the One Who fixes the disaster I call life.

 If you’d like to see Steven Furtick’s video message from Elevation Church, here’s the link!

 http://elevationchurch.org/sermons

Hunting for Happiness

This weekend is almost sacred in West Virginia, some treat it as such, I won’t give that thought much comment other than to say it’s serious business. Millions of dollars of merchandise is sold to make the catch easier and greater and overall make the hunt more enjoyable. And such is the quest for most lives. We want the best, we want it easy and we want it now. We want happy, happy, happy!

As I read the story of the one of the greatest hunters in the Bible this morning, my “Mothering emotions” were at both ends of the spectrum. Yes I was frustrated that he treated his birthright with such disregard as to trade it for a bowl of soup, and Jacob… what a little enterpriser to take advantage of his brother’s weary state to obtain his inheritance. And then the blessing of their father Isaac, what a debacle that was with their own mother conniving Jacob’s way into fooling her husband into thinking Jacob was Esau, thus getting the rest of Esau’s inheritance. My heart broke when I read Esau’s reaction that …he cried with a great and exceeding bitter cry, and said unto his father, Bless me, even me also, O my father.  Only to hear his father say “Thy brother came with subtilty, and hath taken away thy blessing.

Good grief is this not dysfunction at its finest from the grandsons of the great Abraham. Why would God allow the prosperity of Jacob at the expense of Esau? I think it goes to the heart of the matter. When we look at Esau’s life, he not only knowingly gave away his birthright, but he also caused his parents great grief by marrying into a Canaanite family (who were strangers to the blessings of Abraham) not once but twice. Esau’s behaviors proved that he not only did not respect the blessings of God, but did not fear the curse of disobedience.

So God allows Jacob, who He knows to be a deceiver, to receive the greatest blessings, although his life was not without heartache as well. Both brothers wanted happiness, but he who received the greater was the brother with a heart for God. The more I read and the more I understood Esau’s disrespect of God and family the less I wondered why the birthright ended up in Jacob’s hand.

I’m always hunting for happiness too. I want that ease of life that comes from the blessings of God. But as sure as my name’s Shari, I’ve likely missed out on a lot of it because I’ve haphazardly handled the things I’ve been given. I guess I have a little of both Esau and Jacob characteristics. In the hunt for happiness it comes down to one thing. Outside of God and His plan we may have “stuff” but we’ll also have strife. It’s only in the confines of God’s will and grace that we’ll have happiness and contentment. None of which have anything to do with “stuff.”

In the conclusion of this story we find peace between the homes of Jacob and Esau.

Genesis 33:9 ~ And Esau said, I have enough, my brother; keep that thou hast unto thyself.

It’s my prayer that I’ll learn “I have enough.”

Happy, happy, happy!